Dybbuk Movie Review: The Emraan Hashmi and Nikita Dutta starrer is full of jump scares but lacks novelty

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Director: Jay K

Cast: Emraan Hashmi, Nikita Dutta, Manav Kaul, Gaurav Sharma, Denzil Smith

Emraan Hashmi is seen playing Samuel, who get a new job posting at a nuclear waste disposable plant in the oh so scenic Mauritius capital of Port Louis. However, his wife (Nikita Dutta) is not that excited about moving to another land leaving her parents in Mumbai. But being the ideal wife, she tags along with Sam and moves into a beautiful house with an eerie vibe. But she stumbles on a demonic spirit inside a Jewish wine box. Intrigued by its mystery, the wife decided to open up the box which contained the Dybbuk which is a disembodied human spirit that feeds on its hosts.

The movie has quite a lot of jump scares, from the Ghost creeping in the bed to cracking mirrors and flickering lights. When things take a toss for the worse, an exorcism is the only way left. Can they overcome the Dybbuk for the rest of the plot?

 

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Director Jay K has remade Ezra as Dybbuk which was his debut Malayalam movie. Ezra starred Prithviraj and Priya Anand and Emraan Hashmi has stepped into the shoes of Prithviraj as Sam. While, Emraan and Nikita fill in their characters well, but the plot falls really short. The usual jump scares and plot twists that you see coming make you take a back seat. The curiosity really falls short.

 

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Hashmi is seen as the typical husband who finds it difficult to believe the claims his wife makes about the ghost she saw in the mirror. But it all makes sense when he falls through the attic while following a sound. The actor is seen in his Raaz element. The flashback part is much appreciated as most horror stories do. The insight into the cruse was much needed which creates a lot of intrigue. Dybbuk is an ancient Jewish custom that was written in the 16th century, but it came into play in 1914.

 

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While the Dybbuk is no conjuring, the novelty is very minimum in a movie that shows a sincere effort.

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